Updated: Jul 5, 2019

The Spaces Between is a series of city-wide exhibitions and programs facilitating the exploration of the spaces of marginalized status in American culture that often erase whole communities, and showcasing the work of artists whose complex identities are often overlooked by contemporary society.


How do we bear witness to people who don’t exist?


Despite what we see in popular media, most borders are not physical ones; they are emotional or cultural boundaries that are put into place through social constructs. So how does a person who occupies that liminal territory - that transitional place just beyond what most of us are able to perceive - feel truly seen?


The Spaces Between is a series of city-wide exhibitions and programs facilitating the exploration of the spaces of marginalized status in American culture that often erase whole communities, and showcasing the work of artists whose complex identities are often overlooked by contemporary society.

For three months starting in July, artists and residents of Kingston and the greater Hudson Valley are invited to challenge traditional notions of "marginalized status" by considering the many ways people can be made invisible related to race, gender, and sexual identity.

Through music, art, poetry, food, storytelling, and community dialogue, we will investigate what these spaces look like and how we live within and negotiate between them, as well as the normalized statuses that marginalized communities simultaneously reject and desire.

Kingston City Hall will host a three-month exhibition of photographic work by Alex Pacheco, titled “En Camino: Destination Forward” which explores his experience as a witness to his family’s journey as immigrants in the United States.


During the month of August, the Hudson Valley LGBTQ Center will host a group show of artists titled “Entre Espacios,” featuring the works of Maria Liebana, Athena Torri, Juan Hinojosa, Marco Silva, and Kaci Martinez.


On Wednesday, July 10, from 7 to 9 PM at the Reher Center, Maria Elena Ferrer Harrington will lead a workshop on migratory mourning which is the grief experienced by immigrants, especially when faced with adversity.


Ethnic food restaurant owners will share stories about altering their menus for American tastes during “On a Scale of One to Ten” on Monday, August 12, at 7PM at the Reher Center.


Funding is provided by Arts Mid-Hudson, Humanities New York, and FairGame Arts Grant. In-kind donations from Latinx Project, the Reher Center for Immigration Culture and History, and the Hudson Valley LGBTQ Center.


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